Aug 312011
 

So we updated MDC to MindTouch 10.1 yesterday, and have a few things not yet working right. I’ll lay those out here so you know what to watch for:

  • Currently, the toolbar in the editor is the default toolbar. We have configured our same custom toolbar we had before, but it’s not working. We don’t yet know why, but are investigating. In the meantime, a lot of things are less convenient than they should be while editing.
  • As you scroll through a document while editing, the toolbar is making its way down the screen instead of staying at the top of the window like it’s supposed to. This, too, we have yet to explain.

I’ve just fixed a syntax error in some of our templates, where we were using an unsupported syntax that now generates an error. I’m sure we’ll find a few more of them and need to fix them as well, but at least the problem is understood.

I’ll post again with updated status as well as an overview of the good things about this upgrade, once we’re finished cleaning up.

 Posted by at 8:23 PM
Aug 252011
 

Here are today’s Wiki Wednesday articles! If you know about these topics, please try to find a few minutes to look over these articles that are marked as needing technical intervention and see if you can fix them up. You can do so either by logging into the wiki and editing the articles directly, or by emailing your notes, sample code, or feedback to mdnwiki@mozilla.org.

Contributors to Wiki Wednesday will get recognition in next week’s Wiki Wednesday announcement. Thanks in advance for your help!

JavaScript

Thanks to bholley and Endymion for contributing last week!

SpiderMonkey

Developing Mozilla

Extensions

XUL

XPCOM

Interfaces

Plugins

CSS

Thanks to yyss, myakura, and Darth_NormaN for their contributions last week.

SVG

HTML

Thanks to tehsis, Ms2ger, and Manuel Strehl for their contributions last week.

DOM

Thanks to myakura for contributing last week.

 Posted by at 9:01 AM
Aug 172011
 

Here are today’s Wiki Wednesday articles! If you know about these topics, please try to find a few minutes to look over these articles that are marked as needing technical intervention and see if you can fix them up. You can do so either by logging into the wiki and editing the articles directly, or by emailing your notes, sample code, or feedback to mdnwiki@mozilla.org.

Contributors to Wiki Wednesday will get recognition in next week’s Wiki Wednesday announcement. Thanks in advance for your help!

JavaScript

Thanks to Sevenspade for contributing last week.

SpiderMonkey

Thanks to Mark Giffin for contributing last week.

Developing Mozilla

Extensions

XUL

XPCOM

Interfaces

Plugins

CSS

Thanks to Panagiotis Tsalaportas for contributing last week.

SVG

Thanks to Manuel Strehl for last week’s contributions.

HTML

DOM

 Posted by at 5:07 PM
Aug 102011
 

Here are today’s Wiki Wednesday articles! If you know about these topics, please try to find a few minutes to look over these articles that are marked as needing technical intervention and see if you can fix them up. You can do so either by logging into the wiki and editing the articles directly, or by emailing your notes, sample code, or feedback to mdnwiki@mozilla.org.

Contributors to Wiki Wednesday will get recognition in next week’s Wiki Wednesday announcement. Thanks in advance for your help!

JavaScript

SpiderMonkey

Thanks to Panagiotis Tsalaportas for contributing last week!

Developing Mozilla

Thanks to Neil Rashbrook for contributing last week!

Extensions

Thanks to Panagiotis Tsalaportas for contributing last week!

XUL

Thanks to Neil Rashbrook for his contributions last week.

XPCOM

Thanks to Neil Rashbrook for contributing last week.

Interfaces

Plugins

Thanks to Benjamin Smedberg for stamping out useless content last week.

CSS

SVG

Thanks to Panagiotis Tsalaportas for contributing last week!

HTML

DOM

 Posted by at 4:16 PM
Aug 102011
 

Yesterday, it was pointed out to me that a lot of links on the Mozilla Developer Center wiki had rel=”nofollow” set on them. Well, this was a surprise. We certainly weren’t doing that on purpose!

After a brief investigation, I realized that this was being done automatically for links generated by scripts using the MindTouch web.link() method. A quick support request to MindTouch, and I got a configuration setting change that let me turn this off. I applied that change this morning, and had IT restart the wiki to make sure it was picked up on all of our hosts.

That should, hopefully, improve our Google juice a bit for internally-linked items.

For any MindTouch users that stumble upon this post while researching a solution to this same issue: set the editor/web-link-nofollow preference to false in the advanced configuration editor.

 Posted by at 3:07 PM
Aug 072011
 

This morning, Sarah woke me up as I was in the middle of an interesting dream. Every now and then, I have a dream in which the action of the dream is actually a movie that I’m watching, rather than it being happening to me. That’s what this one was like.

This dream was sort of a science fiction suspense film, somewhat along the lines of Alien. It was even from about that same time period of sci-fi filmmaking; the story took place on one of those ’70s-style glossy white space stations, and the star was, of all people, Kris Kristofferson. The movie started out by setting the scene, people going about their work on the space station. It was a huge place with gently curved corridors that clearly implied that it was one of those huge spinning wheel in orbit type of stations, with roughly Earth-level artificial gravity.

After a while, the strange things started to happen; people vanishing or dying inexplicably.

Eventually, there’s a scene in a small dining hall or mess hall in which some scientists and other personnel are having a meal and talking about the strange things gong on. As this is going on, one middle-aged scientist is talking about something, being pretty nonchalant about it, and the camera is slowly moving in on him. Then, from out of nowhere, this small floating object, which looked sort of like a helium balloon in the shape of a pair of chromosomes, but yellow and slightly fuzzy, drifted into view from nowhere. Everyone grows quiet and watches it, except the one guy who keeps talking, even after noticing it.

He doesn’t seem overly concerned about it, which I thought was strange, and he didn’t really react until it wrapped itself around his face and began to eat him. Then the camera cuts away to introduce the story’s hero, played by Kristofferson, as he enters his quarters from a corridor, somewhat bent out of shape over something related to his workday. He’s unaware of the goings-on.

This is a younger Kristofferson (harkening back to my sense that this was a ’70s-era sci-fi story), with longish dark hair and scraggly beard. He tosses the stuff he’s carrying onto the bed, and is getting ready to do something (I’m not sure what; make a meal, take a shower, whatever), when the station PA system announces an alert and orders a stationwide evacuation.

The hero throws on a (white, of course) jacket and bolts from his quarters into the corridor, which is strangely empty given the ongoing evacuation.

And that’s where Sarah woke me up. So I have no idea what happens next.

 Posted by at 12:33 PM
Aug 042011
 

A few minutes ago, I saved off the last document for the new static preference API introduced in Firefox 6. That completes my work on Firefox 6 documentation; in a few minutes, I’ll begin working in earnest on the documentation for Firefox 7. It’s been a challenge to keep up with the impressive pace of development the coding folks are pulling off in our new world order, but so far we’re managing!

There are a couple of little things that are technically still left to be done that are listed as Firefox 6 documentation issues, but in reality, they’re either not really Firefox 6 specific or they’re so obscure that spending time writing about them doesn’t make a lot of sense. So, for all intents and purposes, the Firefox 6 documentation is done.

For me, there are a few particular highlights of working on the documentation for Firefox 6 I’d like to share.

WebSockets

This was a lot of fun to write about, which is ironic, since I dreaded writing about it for months for some reason. I wrote a fun demo and the documentation came together quickly after that. My demo is a more or less fully functional multi-user chat system. Once we have the infrastructure in place for hosting WebSocket demos, I’ll be sure to post it.

Amusingly, my demo is only compatible with Firefox 6 right now (at least as far as Firefox is concerned) because it relies on the specific version of the WebSocket protocol supported by Firefox 6. The joys of life on the bleeding edge of technology!

Touch events

Another one I had fun with was documenting touch events for Firefox mobile. I wrote a simple but effective demo, which would have been more interesting if our touch event support were a little more complete (although, to be fair, the problem may be the hardware I’m testing on, not our implementation!). Being able to detect things like pressure, the size and shape of the contact with the touch surface, and so on is going to have a lot of possible uses. I can see doing some fun finger-painting web apps for kids, for example.

Server-sent events

Server-sent events was the second-to-last thing I documented. It landed relatively late in the development process., so it took a while to get to it from a writing standpoint. It turned out to be a very simple API, and I wrote a simple example that pulled the documentation together pretty quickly. It’s always nice when a quick example makes everything very clear. Once you have the example, producing documentation is easy.

And much, much more!

Of course there’s a ton of stuff in Firefox 6! Lots of new CSS features, support for the HTML5 progress element, and a lot of improvements to standards adherence are just a few of the things that are great about Firefox 6. Hopefully you find developing for Firefox 6 — whether on the web or as an add-on developer — just as exciting as I have.

Now, onward to Firefox 7!

 Posted by at 10:01 AM
Aug 042011
 

(Yeah, it’s Thursday — sorry).

Here are today’s Wiki Wednesday articles! If you know about these topics, please try to find a few minutes to look over these articles that are marked as needing technical intervention and see if you can fix them up. You can do so either by logging into the wiki and editing the articles directly, or by emailing your notes, sample code, or feedback to mdnwiki@mozilla.org.

Contributors to Wiki Wednesday will get recognition in next week’s Wiki Wednesday announcement. Thanks in advance for your help!

JavaScript

SpiderMonkey

Thanks to Mark Giffin for contributing since last time.

Developing Mozilla

Extensions

Thanks to Marc-Aurèle Darche for his contribution.

XUL

Thanks to darktrojan for contributing!

XPCOM

Interfaces

Thanks to Mark Finkle and Trevor Hobson for their contributions since last time.

Plugins

CSS

Thanks to McGurk for contributing!

SVG

HTML

DOM

 Posted by at 9:29 AM