Oct 192016

One of the most underappreciated features of Firefox’s URL bar and its bookmark system is its support for custom keyword searches. These let you create special bookmarks that type a keyword followed by other text, and have that text inserted into a URL identified uniquely by the keyword, then that URL gets loaded. This lets you type, for example, “quote aapl” to get a stock quote on Apple Inc.

You can check out the article I linked to previously (and here, as well, for good measure) for details on how to actually create and use keyword searches. I’m not going to go into details on that here. What I am going to do is share a few keyword searches I’ve configured that I find incredibly useful as a programmer and as a writer on MDN.

For web development

Here are the search keywords I use the most as a web developer.

Keyword Description URL
if Opens an API reference page on MDN given an interface name. https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/%s
elem Opens an HTML element’s reference page on MDN. https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/HTML/Element/%s
css Opens a CSS reference page on MDN. https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/CSS/%s
fx Opens the release notes for a given version of Firefox, given its version number. https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/Firefox/Releases/%s
mdn Searches MDN for the given term(s) using the default filters, which generally limit the search to include only pages most useful to Web developers. https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/search?q=%s
mdnall Searches MDN for the given term(s) with no filters in place. https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/search?q=%s&none=none

For documentation work

When I’m writing docs, I actually use the above keywords a lot, too. But I have a few more that I get a lot of use out of, too.

Keyword Description URL
bug Opens the specified bug in Mozilla’s Bugzilla instance, given a bug number. https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=%s
bs Searches Bugzilla for the specified term(s). https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/buglist.cgi?quicksearch=%s
dxr Searches the Mozilla source code on DXR for the given term(s). https://dxr.mozilla.org/mozilla-central/search?q=%s
file Looks for files whose name contains the specified text in the Mozilla source tree on DXR. https://dxr.mozilla.org/mozilla-central/search?q=path%3A%s
ident Looks for definitions of the specified identifier (such as a method or class name) in the Mozilla code on DXR. https://dxr.mozilla.org/mozilla-central/search?q=id%3A%s
func Searches for the definition of function(s)/method(s) with the specified name, using DXR. https://dxr.mozilla.org/mozilla-central/search?q=function%3A%s
t Opens the specified MDN KumaScript macro page, given the template/macro name. https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Template:%s
wikimo Searches wiki.mozilla.org for the specified term(s). https://wiki.mozilla.org/index.php?search=%s

Obviously, DXR is a font of fantastic information, and I suggest click the “Operators” button at the right end of the search bar there to see a list of the available filters; building search keywords for many of these filters can make your life vastly easier, depending on your specific needs and work habits!

 Posted by at 5:33 PM
Jul 262016

The Web moves pretty fast. Things are constantly changing, and the documentation content on the Mozilla Developer Network (MDN) is constantly changing, too. The pace of change ebbs and flows, and often it can be helpful to know when changes occur. I hear this most from a few categories of people:

  • Firefox developers who work on the code which implements a particular technology. These folks need to know when we’ve made changes to the documentation so they can review our work and be sure we didn’t make any mistakes or leave anything out. They often also like to update the material and keep up on what’s been revised recently.
  • MDN writers and other contributors who want to ensure that content remains correct as changes are made. With so many people making change to some of our content, keeping up and being sure mistakes aren’t made and that style guides are followed is important.
  • Contributors to specifications and members of technology¬†working groups. These are people who have a keen interest in knowing how their specifications are being interpreted and implemented, and in the response to what they’ve designed. The text of our documentation and any code samples, and changes made to them, may be highly informative for them to that end.
  • Spies. Ha! Just kidding. We’re all about being open in the Mozilla community, so spies would be pretty bored watching our content.

There are a few ways to watch content for changes, from the manual to the automated. Let’s take a look at the most basic and immediately useful tool: MDN page and subpage subscriptions.

Subscribing to a page

Animation showing how to subscribe to a single MDN page After logging into your MDN account (creating one if you don’t already have one), make your way to the page you want to subscribe to. Let’s say you want to be sure nobody messes around with the documentation about <marquee> because, honestly, why would anyone need to change that anyway?

Find the Watch button near the top of the MDN page; it’s a drawing of an eye. In the menu that opens when you hover over that icon, you’ll find the option “Subscribe to this page.” Simply click that. From then on, each time someone makes a change to the page, you’ll get an email. We’ll talk about that email in a moment.

First, we need to consider another form of content subscriptions: subtree or sub-article subscriptions.

Subscribing to a subtree of pages


 Posted by at 8:15 PM