Nov 132015

I’m going to highlight a meeting for you today. This is the point where you yawn politely, look at the time, and and try to escape without my noticing. But I see you over there! Get back here. This is important!

Each Thursday, the MDN content team holds its weekly API documentation meeting at 8 AM Pacific time in Mozilla’s Open the DevEngage Vidyo room. This meeting is for discussions about ongoing and upcoming work on documentation for all Web APIs. This includes the classic DOM as well as all newer APIs, from Ambient Light to Speech Synthesis and beyond. It even includes Firefox OS-specific APIs. We don’t even discriminate against non-standard APIs, as long as they’re exposed to browser content.

That’s a lot of stuff to cover! Everything needs to be understood, written about, sample code located or created (and tested!), and all tied together and reviewed until it makes sense and is as accurate as we can make it.

That’s why we have been holding these meetings in collaboration with the API development team for a long. A few months ago, the technical evangelism team also started sending a representative to each meeting. This tripartite meeting lets each team share recent accomplishments and what they’ll be doing next. This has multiple benefits:

  • The writers learn what new technologies are being implemented, what improvements are in the works, and when things are likely to ship. We also learn when special events are coming that would benefit from having documentation ready.
  • The technical evangelists get details on what new APIs are coming up, and can discuss plans for spreading the word with the developers creating the APIs and the writers documenting them, to coordinate plans and schedules.
  • The technical evangelists can relay user sentiment information in a more personal way to both the development teams and the writers; this kind of feedback is incredibly helpful!
  • The development team can let the writers and evangelists know what the status is on current API work, and we can discuss this status in a team setting instead of only reading about it in a formal note or bug comments.
  • The developers can share information about what problem points they see or expect to exist in understanding and working with technologies, in order to help guide future work in samples, demos, and documentation.

There are intangible benefits, too. Over the two-plus years we’ve been holding this weekly meeting, we’ve developed an increasingly close working relationship between the developer documentation and the API engineering teams. This has enormous benefits not just for these two teams, but for the Web we serve.

If you have a passion for creating APIs for the Web or for teaching others how to use them, please consider joining our meeting. Even if you only drop in once in a while, you’ll find it a great way to stay informed and to help guide the future of our content and evangelism efforts.

 Posted by at 6:07 PM
Nov 032015

It’s been a while since I wrote anything on my blog about technology or the Web (indeed, the last several posts I’ve written have been my 5-word movie reviews. While fun, these aren’t very informative to the primary audience of my blog: you, the (probably) Web developer, genius type.

A lot has changed in the last few months. We’ve got so many exciting new technologies and APIs to play with. Not to mention ECMAScript 6 (a.k.a. ECMAScript 2015, a.k.a. the latest version of JavaScript). In ES6, the big new toys, for me, are Promises and arrow functions. Both take some getting used to, but once you do, they make a huge difference in code readability and despite feeling alien and weird to my old procedural programming brain, they still make code just plain better.

Add to that all the amazing new APIs, including WebRTC, Web Notifications, Service Workers, the Push API, and so much more, and my mind boggles at the immense power of the Web in this day and age.

I was in college when the Web first exploded into existence. Back then, it was mostly a thing students and researchers played with, but I already knew it was going to change the world. And it has.

I’ll try to get back into the habit of blogging more regularly; there’s far too much exciting stuff to talk about to let my blog stay idle any longer.

 Posted by at 11:19 AM
Apr 032015

It was nine years ago today that I joined Mozilla as a senior technical writer. I was hired by Mike Shaver and Deb Richardson to help try to keep up with the pace of progress and to work on organizing and cleaning up older content as well. I actually started working the last few days of March, but my first official day (that is to say, the first day I was paid for) was April 3, 2006.

My daughter wasn’t even a year old yet then. Now she’s almost finished with the fourth grade.

We were deep into the documentation process for Firefox 2.0 back then (not to mention trying to finish bits and pieces of critical documentation for Firefox 1.5, which shipped months earlier). It shipped a few months after my joining the company, and was the first release we generally felt was completely documented (for a slightly flexible definition of “completely”).

A lot has changed over those nine years. Back then, Deb and I were the entire writing staff; we had some contributors but not nearly enough. Then Deb moved onward and upward into other awesome things and it was just me for a while. But eventually we started hiring more writers, thankfully, and we wound up with the kick-ass staff we have today. And as we built up our staff, we learned more about community building, and our community of volunteer writers and contributors has grown at an ever-increasing rate.

This is far and away the longest I’ve spent at any job. It’s a great deal of fun, even when I’m stressing out over all the stuff I wish I had time to write about but don’t. Making the world a better place to be a Web developer is a rewarding career path, and I’m glad Dave Miller steered me into the Mozilla community.

 Posted by at 11:00 AM