Aug 062019
 

Picture of an old clockOne of my most dreaded tasks is that of estimating how long tasks will take to complete while doing sprint planning. I have never been good at this, and it has always felt like time stolen away from the pool of hours available to do what I can’t help thinking of as “real work.”

While I’m quite a bit better at the time estimating process than I was a decade ago—and perhaps infinitely better at it than I was 20 years ago—I still find that I, like a lot of the creative and technical professionals I know, dread the process of poring over bug and task lists, project planning documents, and the like in order to estimate how long things will take to do.

This is a particularly frustrating process when dealing with tasks that may be nested, have multiple—often not easily detected ahead of time—dependencies, and may involve working with technologies that aren’t actually as ready for prime time as expected. Add to that the fact that your days are filled with distractions, interruptions, and other tasks you need to deal with, and predicting how long a given project will take can start to feel like a guessing game.

The problem isn’t just one of coming up with the estimates. There’s a more fundamental problem of how to measure time. Do you estimate projects in terms of the number of work hours you’ll invest in them? The number of days or weeks you’ll spend on each task? Or some other method of measuring duration?

Hypothetical ideal days

On the MDN team, we have begun over the past year to use a time unit we call the hypothetical ideal day or simply ideal day. This is a theoretical time unit in which you are able to work, uninterrupted, on a project for an entire 8-hour work day. A given task may take any appropriate number of ideal days to complete, depending on its size and complexity. Some tasks may take less than a single ideal day, or may otherwise require a fractional number of ideal days (like 0.5 ideal days, or 1.25 ideal days). We generally round to a quarter of a day.

There obviously isn’t actually any such thing as an ideal, uninterrupted day (hence the words “hypothetical” and “theoretical” earlier in this paragraph). Even on one’s best day, you have to stop to eat, to stretch, and do do any number of other things that you have to do during a day of work. But that’s the point to the ideal day unit: by building right into the unit the understanding that you’re not explicitly accounting for these interruptions in the time value, you can reinforce the idea that schedules are fragile, and that every time a colleague or your manager (or anyone else) causes you to be distracted from your planned tasks, the schedule will slip.

That means that each ideal day may actually last anywhere from one to three or more days in the real world, depending on what’s going on. Every meeting, phone call, sidetracking onto an unscheduled task, bad night’s sleep, high pollen day, or bad news day can impact the amount of real-life time required to complete one ideal day’s worth of work.

Ideal days in sprint planning

The goal, then, during sprint planning is to do your best to leave room for those distractions when mapping ideal days to the actual calendar. Our sprints on the MDN team are 12 business days long. When selecting tasks to attempt to accomplish during a sprint, we start by having each team member count up how many of those 12 days they will be available for work. This involves subtracting from that 12-day sprint any PTO days, company or local holidays, substantial meetings, and so forth.

When calculating my available days, I like to subtract a rough number of partial days to account for any appointments that I know I’ll have. We then typically subtract about 20% (or a day or two per sprint, although the actual amount varies from person to person based on how often they tend to get distracted and how quickly they rebound), to allow for distractions and sidetracking, and to cover typical administrative needs. The result is a rough estimate of the number of ideal days we’re available to work during the sprint.

With that in hand, each member of the team can select a group of tasks that can probably be completed during the number of ideal days we estimate they’ll have available during the sprint. But we know going in that these estimates are in terms of ideal days, not actual business days, and that if anything unanticipated happens, the mapping of ideal days to actual days we did won’t match up anymore, causing the work to take longer than anticipated. This understanding is fundamental to how the system works; by going into each sprint knowing that our mapping of ideal days to actual days is subject to external influences beyond our control, we avoid many of the anxieties that come from having rigid or rigid-feeling schedules.

For your consideration

For example, let’s consider a standard 12-business-day MDN sprint which spans my birthday as well as Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, which is a US Federal holiday. During those 12 days, I also have two doctor appointments scheduled which will have me out of the office for roughly half a day total, and I have about a day’s worth of meetings on my schedule as of sprint planning time. Doing the math, then, we find that I have 8.5 days available to work.

Knowing this, I then review the various task lists and find a total of around 8 to 8.5 days worth of work to do. Perhaps a little less if I think the odds are good that more time will be occupied with other things than the calendar suggests. For example, if my daughter is sick, there’s a decent chance I will be too in a few days, so I might take on just a little less work for the sprint.

As the sprint begins, then, I have an estimated 8 ideal days worth of work to do during the 12-day sprint. Because of the “ideal day” system, everyone on the team knows that if there are any additional interruptions—even short ones—the odds of completing everything on the list are reduced. As such, this system not only helps make it easier to estimate how long tasks will take, but also helps to reinforce with colleagues that we need to stay focused as much as possible, in order to finish everything on time.

If I don’t finish everything on the sprint plan by the end of the sprint, we will discuss it briefly during our end-of-sprint review to see if there’s any adjustment we need to make in future planning sessions, but it’s done with the understanding that life happens, and that sometimes delays just can’t be anticipated or avoided.

On the other hand, if I happen to finish before the sprint is over, I have time to get extra work done, so I go back to the task lists, or to my list of things I want to get done that are not on the priority list right now, and work on those things through the end of the sprint. That way, I’m able to continue to be productive regardless of how accurate my time estimates are.

I can work with this

In general, I really like this way of estimating task schedules. It does a much better job of allowing for the way I work than any other system I’ve been asked to work within. It’s not perfect, and the overhead is a little higher than I’d like, but by and large it does a pretty god job. That’s not to say we won’t try another, possibly better, way of handling the planning process in the future

But for now, my work days are as ideal as can be.

 Posted by at 5:04 PM