Jul 262016

The Web moves pretty fast. Things are constantly changing, and the documentation content on the Mozilla Developer Network (MDN) is constantly changing, too. The pace of change ebbs and flows, and often it can be helpful to know when changes occur. I hear this most from a few categories of people:

  • Firefox developers who work on the code which implements a particular technology. These folks need to know when we’ve made changes to the documentation so they can review our work and be sure we didn’t make any mistakes or leave anything out. They often also like to update the material and keep up on what’s been revised recently.
  • MDN writers and other contributors who want to ensure that content remains correct as changes are made. With so many people making change to some of our content, keeping up and being sure mistakes aren’t made and that style guides are followed is important.
  • Contributors to specifications and members of technology working groups. These are people who have a keen interest in knowing how their specifications are being interpreted and implemented, and in the response to what they’ve designed. The text of our documentation and any code samples, and changes made to them, may be highly informative for them to that end.
  • Spies. Ha! Just kidding. We’re all about being open in the Mozilla community, so spies would be pretty bored watching our content.

There are a few ways to watch content for changes, from the manual to the automated. Let’s take a look at the most basic and immediately useful tool: MDN page and subpage subscriptions.

Subscribing to a page

Animation showing how to subscribe to a single MDN page After logging into your MDN account (creating one if you don’t already have one), make your way to the page you want to subscribe to. Let’s say you want to be sure nobody messes around with the documentation about <marquee> because, honestly, why would anyone need to change that anyway?

Find the Watch button near the top of the MDN page; it’s a drawing of an eye. In the menu that opens when you hover over that icon, you’ll find the option “Subscribe to this page.” Simply click that. From then on, each time someone makes a change to the page, you’ll get an email. We’ll talk about that email in a moment.

First, we need to consider another form of content subscriptions: subtree or sub-article subscriptions.

Subscribing to a subtree of pages


 Posted by at 8:15 PM