Nov 132017
 

Last week, I wrote about the results of our “thin pages” (that is, pages too short to be properly cataloged by search engines) SEO experiment, in which we found that while there appear to be gains in some cases when improving the pages considered to be too short, there was too much uncertainty and too few cases in which gains seemed to occur at all, to justify making a full-fledged effort to fix every thin page on MDN.

However, we do want to try to avoid thin pages going forward! Having content that people can actually find is obviously important. In addition, we encourage contributors working on articles for other reasons who find that they’re too short to go ahead and update them.

I’ve already updated our meta-documentation (that is, our documentation about writing documentation) to incorporate most of the recommendations for avoiding thin content. These changes are primarily in the writing style guide. I’ve also written the initial portions of a separate guide to writing for SEO on MDN.

For fun, let’s review the basics here today!

What’s a thin page?

A thin page is a page that’s too short for search engines to properly catalog and differentiate from other pages. Pages that are shorter than 250-300 words of content text do not provide enough context for search algorithms to reliably comprehend what the article is about, which means the page winds up not in the right place in search results.

For the purposes of computing the length of an article, the article’s length is the number of words of body content—that is, content that isn’t in headers, footers, sidebars, or similar constructs—plus the number of words located in alt text on <img> elements.

How to avoid thin pages

These tips are taken straight from the guidelines on MDN:

  • Keep an eye on the convenient word counter located in the top-right corner of the editor’s toolbar on MDN.
  • Obviously, if the article is a stub, or is missing material, add it. We try to avoid outright “stub” pages on MDN, although they do exist, but there are plenty of pages that are missing large portions of their content while not technically being a “stub.”
  • Generally review the page to ensure that it’s structured properly for the type of page it is. Be sure every section that it should have is present and has appropriate content.
  • Make sure every section is complete and up-to-date, with no information missing. Are all parameters listed and explained?
  • Be sure everything is fully fleshed-out. It’s easy to give a quick explanation of something, but make sure that all the nuances are covered. Are there special cases? Known restrictions that the reader might need to know about?
  • There should be examples covering all parameters or at least common sets of parameters. Each example should be preceded with an overview of what the example will do, what additional knowledge might be needed to understand it, and so forth. After the example (or interspersed among pieces of the example) should be text explaining how the code works. Don’t skimp on the details and the handling of errors in examples; readers will copy and paste your example to use in their own projects, and your code will wind up used on production sites! See Code examples and our Code sample guidelines for more useful information.
  • If there are particularly common use cases for the feature being described, talk about them! Instead of assuming the reader will figure out that the method being documented can be used to solve a common development problem, actually add a section with an example and text explaining how the example works.
  • Include proper alt text on all images and diagrams; this text counts, as do captions on tables and other figures.
  • Do not descend into adding repetitive, unhelpful material or blobs of keywords, in an attempt to improve the page’s size and search ranking. This does more harm than good, both to content readability and to our search results.

Reviewing the above guidelines and suggestions (some of which are admittedly pretty obvious) when confronted with pages that are just too short may help kick-start your creativity so you can write the needed material to ensure that MDN’s content drifts to the top of the turbid sea of web documentation and other content to be found on the Internet.

 Posted by at 12:50 PM